Ask Baz

Cleaning Dry/Compression/Stuff Sacks

How do I clean my Sea to Summit Dry Sacks / Compression Sacks / Stuff Sacks?

Cleaning dry sacks and stuff sacks is really very simple: you can remove most dirt simply with warm water and a non-detergent soap (we'd recommend Sea to Summit Wilderness Wash for this). You should avoid detergents as they can compromise the water-shedding properties of the fabrics; the same applies to solvents only more so - they can cause the coating to delaminate.

It's best to wash the sacks by hand. If they're really dirty, you might want to hose them out first.

If your bags have picked up odors from food spills or dirty clothes, the best way to remove these odors once you've washed the sack is to use a product from McNett called MiraZyme - this enzyme-based cleanser will effectively remove most odors.

Once you've hand washed the sacks, leave them to air-dry. Putting it in a dryer can damage the seam tape. Do make sure they're completely dry before you store them; damp fabrics can be subject to mildew.

4 thoughts on “Cleaning Dry/Compression/Stuff Sacks

  1. avatar Baz says:

    G’Day Jeremy -

    Sorry to learn that your UltraSil™ Compression Dry Sack has developed mold or mildew. To remove this, hand wash using warm water and a non-detergent soap (we’d recommend Sea to Summit Wilderness Wash for this). You should avoid harsh detergents as they can compromise the water-shedding properties of the fabric.

    This process should take care of the mold spores in the fabric (although it may not remove the discoloration). If you still suspect mold spores, or if your compression sack has a mildew odor, the best way to remove these once you’ve washed the compression sack is to use a product from McNett called MiraZyme – this enzyme-based cleanser should kill the mold and will effectively remove most odors.

    If you would like further information, please email us at info@seatosummit.com

    Cheers,
    Baz

  2. avatar Jeremy Odom says:

    What’s the best way to remove mildew from your Ultra-Sil Compression Dry Sack? I left a wet tent in my bag for a few days before removing it and the result was some black mildew on the inside of the bag.

  3. avatar Baz says:

    G’Day Becky

    Sorry to learn that sap has come into contact with your dry bag. The classic technique for removing sap from woven fabrics is to put the item in the freezer; then scrape the hardened sap off using a wooden spatula. If this does not work, you can try softening the sap with isopropyl alcohol, then attempting to scrape off the residue with a wooden implement. If all else fails, we have heard of people using acetone (nail-polish remover) on outdoor gear, then scraping off the sap with a wooden spatula – but this carries the risk that the polyurethane coating/laminate of a dry sack would be damaged by the acetone, and should only be tried as a last resort. At the very least, you would need to wash the treated area with soap and warm water as soon as the acetone had softened the sap.

    Please email us at info@seatosummit.com and let us know what type of dry bag you own – some images of the sap residue would be helpful.

    Best of luck!

    Baz

  4. avatar Becky M Wilkey says:

    Any recommendations on how to get sap off a dry bag without ruining the integrity of it?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *